Opioid Reversal Kit

A medication called naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdose of heroin or some types of painkillers. Paramedics and emergency room doctors have used it for years to save lives.

In some states, if you, a family member, or a friend is addicted to heroin or narcotic painkillers known as opioids, you can carry naloxone. A pocket-size device that contains an injectible form of naloxone is available for use. A nasal spray version has also been approved for use and requires no special training to administer.

How It Works
Naloxone blocks the effects of drugs made from opium, or opioids. These include:
heroin
morphine
oxycodone
methadone
fentanyl
hydrocodone
codeine
hydromorphone
buprenorphine
Opioids slow your breathing. If you take too much of one, your breathing may stop and you could die. If given soon enough, naloxone can counter the overdose effects, usually within minutes.

Rising Overdose Deaths
Deaths from overdoses of narcotic prescription painkillers more than tripled in the U.S. from 2000 to 2014. These drugs now kill more people than heroin and cocaine combined.

Heroin use is also growing in the U.S. The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that 669,000 Americans use the illegal substance — nearly twice as many as in 2007. Deaths from heroin overdoses tripled between 2010 and 2014.

The rise in heroin use is believed to be linked to prescription drug abuse. Many people who abuse painkillers switch to heroin for two reasons: It is cheaper and often easier to get.

Because of naloxone’s effectiveness, the White House drug policy office now urges first responders, such as police and firefighters, to carry it.

Using Naloxone
Naloxone is given by shot or nasal spray.

A person who has overdosed may:

be breathing very slow or not breathing
have blue or purplish lips or fingernails
be limp
be vomiting or gurgling
not wake up or respond if you try to rouse him
If a person shows signs of an overdose:

Call 911 right away.
Begin rescue breathing, if the person isn’t taking in air.
Give the person naloxone.

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A medication called naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdose of heroin or some types of painkillers. Paramedics and emergency room doctors have used it for years to save lives. In some states, if you, a family member, or a friend is addicted to heroin or narcotic painkillers known as opioids, you can carry naloxone. A pocket-size device that contains an injectible form of naloxone is available for use. A nasal spray version has also been approved for use and requires no special training to administer. How It Works Naloxone blocks the effects of drugs made from opium, or opioids. These include: heroin morphine oxycodone methadone fentanyl hydrocodone codeine hydromorphone buprenorphine Opioids slow your breathing. If you take too much of one, your breathing may stop and you could die. If given soon enough, naloxone can counter the overdose effects, usually within minutes. Rising Overdose Deaths Deaths from overdoses of narcotic prescription painkillers more than tripled in the U.S. from 2000 to 2014. These drugs now kill more people than heroin and cocaine combined. Heroin use is also growing in the U.S. The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that 669,000 Americans use the illegal substance — nearly twice as many as in 2007. Deaths from heroin overdoses tripled between 2010 and 2014. The rise in heroin use is believed to be linked to prescription drug abuse. Many people who abuse painkillers switch to heroin for two reasons: It is cheaper and often easier to get. Because of naloxone’s effectiveness, the White House drug policy office now urges first responders, such as police and firefighters, to carry it. Using Naloxone Naloxone is given by shot or nasal spray. A person who has overdosed may: be breathing very slow or not breathing have blue or purplish lips or fingernails be limp be vomiting or gurgling not wake up or respond if you try to rouse him If a person shows signs of an overdose: Call 911 right away. Begin rescue breathing, if the person isn’t taking in air. Give the person naloxone.

Keeping You and the Environment Safe!

Hello,

Wishing You a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year!

Using the Halo Fogger to kill Infectious Pathogens including H5N1, H7N1, HIV, Salmonella, Clostridium Difficile (C-diff), MRSA, E-Coli, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus and FUNGI can save your Institution Money! Being Pro-active at your Gym, School, Rehabilitation Center, Surgical Center, Endoscopy Center Etc. can help your facility receive Higher Patient Satisfaction Scores. This will result in an increase in your Reimbursements!

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Inogen 3 Product Summary

Next generation POC – at only 4.8 pounds its 30% lighter than G2 and its truly easy to carry

  • 8 pounds
  • Settings 1-4 (840 ml/min)
  • 4 hour battery time on setting 2
  • 8 hour battery life w/ 24 cell
  • 39 dBA @ setting 2 (very quiet)
  • 24/7 – 30,000 hour service
  • Externally mounted interchangeable batteries extend service life
  • Unique replaceable sieve beds (patent pending) fosters field changes versus repair shop burden
  • Data download capability (Inogen exclusive) aids troubleshooting and compliance analysis
  • Sensitivity

–0.12 cm/H2O negative pressure to detect a breath

–Sensitivity is sensitive enough to detect breaths during sleep.

  • BPM

–40 BPM maximum allowed breathing rate

–40 BPM max prevents inconsistencies due to pneumatic noise after a bolus.

  • Product Rate

–There as a fixed volume delivery per minute independent of breathing rate

  • Bolus Volume

–The conserver is tuned to deliver proper volume with output filter and cannula in place.

–Lack of output filter or cannula will increase bolus volume and decrease oxygen concentration.